Globalization and Security

The track approaches security as a fundamental human need from two perspectives: (1) the traditional geopolitical-military approach and (2) the newer, more critical view that the state-centered high politics approach distorts understandings of contemporary security problems. In other words, security pertains to both old and new threats that concern individual states but also transcend individual state boundaries impacting communities, ethnic groups, individuals, or the international system as a whole. In addition, solutions to these problems necessitate not only state involvement but require collective strategies on a global and regional scale. Intelligence agencies, government ministries, nongovernmental organizations and international organizations are all seeking employees with the acumen to understand and deal with these security complexes.

To prepare students for careers in this area, the curriculum includes both foundational courses necessary to understand current global trends as well as courses that emphasize policy analysis to deal with numerous security-related issues impacted by globalization. Courses in economics, quantitative and research methods, and writing and presentation skills provide our students with additional academic and professional preparation. Most unique to our curriculum is a capstone project whereby students, in partnership with a professional organization/agency as well as a faculty advisor, work on a policy-relevant topic providing a high-quality written product and a presentation. The entire curriculum is supplemented with professional development seminars that provide additional skills in areas such as career services, leadership, interviewing, and grant writing. Students may also partake in intensive foreign language instruction through the program’s optional language component. During the summer, between the first and second years, students are encouraged to pursue internships with not-for-profit organizations, intergovernmental organizations, government, transnational organizations, nongovernmental organizations and international companies.

Plan of Study

Year One

  • First Semester (9 credits)
    • Foundations of Globalization (3 credits)
    • Economic Policy Analysis (3 credits)
    • Analytical Writing and Presentation Skills (3 credits)
  • Second Semester (9 credits)
    • Research Tools for Global Studies (3 credits)
    • Globalization and Security Course (3 credits)
    • Globalization and Security Course (3 credits)
  • Non-Credit Professional Development Seminars

Year Two

  • Third Semester (9 credits)
    • Program Design and Evaluation OR Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation (3 credits)
    • Globalization and Security Course (3 credits)
    • Globalization and Security Course (3 credits)
  • Fourth Semester (9 credits)
    • Master’s Capstone (3 credits)
    • Globalization and Security Course (3 credits)
    • Globalization and Security Course (3 credits)
  • Non-Credit Professional Development Seminars